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:: My Little Eye

This new psychological thriller is best described as a cross between television reality show, Big Brother and Indie horror film, The Blair Witch Project. Directed by Marc Evans and written by David Hilton and James Watkins, My Little Eye was shot on a next to nothing budget on digital video cameras rigged up to look like web cams, featuring a cast of relative unknowns and an ending that will kill you.

Derived from a dream that writer David Hilton awoke from one night, My Little Eye explores and subverts the notion of reality television in its extreme form. The idea is a simple one, six twentysomethings sign up to be part of a reality television show in which they cohabitate in a house up in the mountains for six months. If they all stay for the duration of the time they all win one million dollars each, however if one of them leaves the house before the prescribed time they all walk away empty-handed. The house is set up with multiple web cams in every room and every angle. Every second of their six months is recorded and streamed live into a web site.

Towards the end of their tenure, weird things start to happen. One of the house occupants gets word that his grandfather has died. This forces the group to reassess what’s important and what games are the ‘creators’ of the site up to, is this fact or fiction? Or is this just a ploy to get them to lose their million dollars? Soon after a food package is delivered but instead filled with bricks, soon after another package reveals a gun with a single bullet. The tenants begin to unravel and believe that whoever is out there controlling ‘the game’ must be sick as they dig deep into each persons’ past and reveal all their dirty little secrets. Out of the blue a hiker comes knocking on their door seeking refuge from the cold.

This is odd…they let him in only to find he takes a liking to wannabe superstar chick Charlie. In fact, what is even stranger is after having no clue who this bunch are (oddly enough being a computer programmer none-the-less), he ‘takes’ Charlie whilst staring into the camera telling the viewers “I told you I could f*ck her.” The housemates begin to think something is up and, after his departure, hack into a computer to try to find this site that they’re supposed to be live from. Yes, they do find it, however it was not quite the site they initially thought they’d be on. It’s worse.

The film’s climax comes shortly after when they reach a group consensus to leave in the morning, but where to? What they fail to realise is that the game is not over until the fat lady sings and boy, does she sing. The final twist in the end is shocking and unexpected.

This new psychological thriller is best described as a cross between television reality show, Big Brother and Indie horror film, The Blair Witch Project. Directed by Marc Evans and written by David Hilton and James Watkins, My Little Eye was shot on a next to nothing budget on digital video cameras rigged up to look like web cams, featuring a cast of relative unknowns and an ending that will kill you.

Derived from a dream that writer David Hilton awoke from one night, My Little Eye explores and subverts the notion of reality television in its extreme form. The idea is a simple one, six twentysomethings sign up to be part of a reality television show in which they cohabitate in a house up in the mountains for six months. If they all stay for the duration of the time they all win one million dollars each, however if one of them leaves the house before the prescribed time they all walk away empty-handed. The house is set up with multiple web cams in every room and every angle. Every second of their six months is recorded and streamed live into a web site.

Towards the end of their tenure, weird things start to happen. One of the house occupants gets word that his grandfather has died. This forces the group to reassess what’s important and what games are the ‘creators’ of the site up to, is this fact or fiction? Or is this just a ploy to get them to lose their million dollars? Soon after a food package is delivered but instead filled with bricks, soon after another package reveals a gun with a single bullet. The tenants begin to unravel and believe that whoever is out there controlling ‘the game’ must be sick as they dig deep into each persons’ past and reveal all their dirty little secrets. Out of the blue a hiker comes knocking on their door seeking refuge from the cold.

This is odd…they let him in only to find he takes a liking to wannabe superstar chick Charlie. In fact, what is even stranger is after having no clue who this bunch are (oddly enough being a computer programmer none-the-less), he ‘takes’ Charlie whilst staring into the camera telling the viewers “I told you I could f*ck her.” The housemates begin to think something is up and, after his departure, hack into a computer to try to find this site that they’re supposed to be live from. Yes, they do find it, however it was not quite the site they initially thought they’d be on. It’s worse.

The film’s climax comes shortly after when they reach a group consensus to leave in the morning, but where to? What they fail to realise is that the game is not over until the fat lady sings and boy, does she sing. The final twist in the end is shocking and unexpected.