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:: Pitch Perfect

Just as a book shouldn’t be judged by its cover, likewise a film should never be judged by its trailer. Take a look at the trailer for ‘Pitch Perfect’ and you’ll probably be thinking that this is a film based at teenage girls who think that ‘Glee’ is quality television… what you won’t realise is that ‘Pitch Perfect’ is a fairly decently written comedy with a kick ass soundtrack.

Based on a non-fiction book by Mickey Rapkin ‘Pitch Perfect’ sees Beca (Anna Kendrick) soon find herself part of the College a cappella music scene. The career driven Beca doesn't even want to be a college, she has her future mapped out ahead of her she is going to be a DJ and a music producer, but despite her obvious talents her father forces her to attend Barden University.

In a bid to show her father that she is in fact fitting into the school she reluctantly decides to join the Barden Bellas, a singing group that have been a massive failure over the year, especially due to an on-stage ‘spewing incident’. Rubbing salt into their wounds is the fact that their rivals The Treble Makers are from their school and find regular success. The Barden Bellas’ leaders, Aubrey (Anna Camp) and Chloe (Brittany Snow) are tired of their group constantly finishing second so start a massive recruiting drive that sees the likes of Beca and Fat Amy (Rebel Wilson) joining the ranks. With their rag-tag team of singers coming from all walks of life Aubrey and Chloe know they have their work cut out for them, but that job is made even harder when their members keep breaking the rules and fraternize with the opposition, even Beca isn’t immune when she finds herself attracted to Jesse (Skylar Astin) who is one of the newer Treble Makers.

Surprisingly ‘Pitch Perfect’ doesn’t fall into the same traps that so many of these type of films do. While ‘Step Up’ falls when it introduces lacklustre storylines and character clichés, ‘Pitch Perfect’ does the opposite. Here screenwriter Kay Cannon has blessed the film with interesting characters and given them some fabulous one liners that makes sure the film never dips. In fact so interesting are the characters that you find yourself caring for a quite a few of them.

One of the weaknesses however in Cannon’s writing is that the male characters seem to lack a lot of the spark that the female characters have. The male characters all seem to be there to be the ‘bad guy’ and while film geek Jesse is shown in a different light even his character isn’t strong enough for Skylar Astin to go anywhere near being a good leading man.

The main winners when it comes to ‘Pitch Perfect’ are Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson. Wilson shines when she is given some great moments of ad-libbing (a very funny Tasmanian joke should have Australians laughing) while Kendrick shows the world that she can also sing, and of course there are no questions being asked about her acting since her Oscar nomination… rightfully so. ‘Pitch Perfect’ is good enough that if your kids want to see it you certainly won’t be bored as they watch it, be warned though some of the humour is very adult orientated.